Global Eats Campaign

HelloFresh partnered with Secret Food Tours to promote four internationally-inspired Global Eats recipes. Each time customers ordered one of these meals off the menu, they were entered for the chance to win an all-expenses paid trip to Hong Kong, Hanoi, and Bangkok along with a food walking tour in each city.

To promote the partnership, we played off the notion of step-by-step as a way to tie our simple, 6-step recipes to the walking tours.

Step-by-step recipes that’ll have you stepping (literally) all around the world.

Step-by-step ; country-by-country ; week-by-week

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The Hawaiian Poke Bowl Recipe We Can’t Get Enough Of 

Poke, pronounced poh-kay, is an iconic dish in the Aloha State. Traditionally, it comes in a bowl format with a base of sticky white rice piled high with diced raw fish (typically firmer cuts, like tuna) and piles of crunchy toppings — all of which are slicked in a soy sauce (or as they say in Hawaii, shoyu)-based dressing. Sometimes, lime makes an appearance. More often than not, a shower of scallion greens.

Some would venture to say it’s deconstructed sushi, and we’re inclined to agree considering how closely related Hawaiian and Asian cuisines are.

5 Reasons To Try This Vietnamese Banh Mi Burger STAT 

At once spicy and sour, savory and sweet, bánh mì has become somewhat of an international sandwich sensation over the past few decades. Although in its literal form, the Vietnamese phrase translates to “bread,” it has come to connote in more specific terms a light, fluffy bread that, if you didn’t know any better, would swear is a French baguette. And you wouldn’t necessarily be wrong, since Vietnamese cuisine has been heavily influenced by that of the French since colonial control was established in 1887.

Come 1950, however, the Vietnamese were putting a signature spin on the French classic by mixing rice and wheat flour, baking it until the thin crust was golden brown and crunchy, and filling its roomy pockets with seemingly endless variations of roast chicken or pork, pâté, cured ham, cheese, pickled daikon radishes, carrots, cucumbers, chili peppers, and a generous handful of cilantro. Occasionally, the bread would come smeared with thick mayo. Other times, a dash of a soy sauce-like seasoning known as Maggi.

So when our chefs put their heads together to develop a Vietnamese-inspired recipe, bánh mì was the first thing they thought of. But it stands to reason that if something could stand the test of time and taste THIS good between two slices of bread, it would taste equally as delicious between two buns, right?

And the Bánh Mì Burger was born.

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